Police focus patrols on young drivers

A new Michigan law that has been in effect since March, 2013 is the subject of a reminder by the Michigan State Police at the Gladstone Post.

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Kelsey’s Law is named after 17-year-old Kelsey Raffaele of Sault Ste. Marie. She died in January, 2010 in a car accident that happened while using her cell phone.

Kelsey’s Law bans teenage drivers with a Level 1 or Level 2 license from using a handheld cell phone while behind the wheel.

Kelsey’s Law is named after 17-year-old Kelsey Raffaele of Sault Ste. Marie.  She died in January, 2010 in a car accident that happened while using her cell phone.

Kelsey’s mother, Bonnie Raffaele, was the primary driving force behind Kelsey’s Law.

Bonnie has written a book, “From Despair to Hope”, about the loss of her daughter and the effort to get the law passed.

This school year, troopers from the Gladstone Post of the Michigan State Police will focus patrols in and around Delta and Menominee County school zones to ensure compliance with Kelsey’s Law and the ‘no texting while driving law.’

Violations of Kelsey’s Law are a civil infraction with fines up to $100 as well as possible additional costs up to $100.  There are no points associated with the infraction and it does not impact status in the Graduated Driver Licensing program.

Marquette Police say drivers are gradually realizing how hazardous distracted driving is, and it started with the texting ban.

Texting is illegal for all Michigan drivers.  A July, 2010 law details that motorists will be fined $100 for a first offense and any subsequent offenses will cost $200.